9 June Weekly Update

Dill & Peas

Dill & Peas

This week’s pickings were: the first summer squash (two patty pans), a good bit of lettuce, two green cabbages, multiple harvests (and the last) of sugar snap and shelling peas, the last two garlic scapes, a bit of dill, broccoli, a few test carrots, and potatoes (two Yukon Golds we dug for and a small Kennebec that had surfaced).

Patty Pan Squash & Peas

Patty Pan Squash & Peas

Last peas, cabbage, broccoli, and dill

Last peas, cabbage, broccoli, and dill

Lettuces

Lettuces

Peas

Peas

A day of harvest

A day of harvest

The yellow squash, which is in the same box as the patty pans, is making lots of female flowers but they’re not getting pollinated (some of the patty pans aren’t either). We removed 9 unpollinated squash this week; they start to rot from the blossom end if pollination hasn’t sufficiently occurred. We’re hoping this is going to get rectified soon since we see pollinators in the garden, although not in the quantity we’d like to see.

Zucchini & tomatillo box

Zucchini & tomatillo box

On Monday we saw the first hummingbird of the season! We had put the feeder up over a week ago and thought we were a bit late. But it seems like many things are late this year, including the hummingbirds. She reviewed last year’s blog postings to prepare for upcoming events and concluded that just about everything is at least a couple weeks later (in terms of development) when compared to last year. One of the good things about keeping a blog – you can easily go back and check what was happening when.

Yellow squash, some pollinated

Yellow squash, some pollinated

The last pea plants were removed on Saturday. We worked and weeded the areas and planted the purchased watermelon starts in their box and seeded more field peas (Monkey Tail and Purple Hull) in a different box. The purple hull field peas we seeded last weekend were all up later in the week, as were the butter beans. The haricots verts are flowering so we should be getting beans soon! The first tomato flowers have also happened (on both the slicing and paste varieties).
Winter squash

Winter squash

We decided to try germinating lettuce in porch boxes in the basement and placing them on the front porch (which doesn’t get direct sun) after germination. We had read that the biggest challenge of growing lettuce in summer is getting it to germinate because it won’t if soil temperatures are too high. Since our basement doesn’t really get above 65 degrees, we put three porch containers in the basement for a week (to hopefully bring down the soil temperature if it was too warm) and we seeded three different types of lettuce on Sunday morning. We’ll report future results.
Surreal Red Cabbage Photo

Surreal Red Cabbage Photo

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

and Another Cauliflower

and Another Cauliflower

After complaining about the lack of rain in last week’s post, we got plenty this week! It rained on Monday (about ½ inch, which enough to fill up the rain barrels and give everything a drink) and we were on the edge of the tropical storm that moved up the east coast later in the week. From Thursday morning until Friday evening, we got 2.5 inches of rain. This has caused us to put off pulling up the garlic since the soil is wet and stuck to the test bulb we pulled on Saturday.

36 Hours of Rain

36 Hours of Rain

Butternut Squash & Cucumber

Butternut Squash & Cucumber

Broccoli - later harvested

Broccoli – later harvested

Basil

Basil

Asparagus Ferns

Asparagus Ferns

Three Blackberry Plants

Three Blackberry Plants

 

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9 Responses to “9 June Weekly Update”

  1. The Novice Gardener Says:

    Nice cauliflowers, never could get them to grow well in my garden. Btw, the leaves are edible. I’ve made them into pakoras and were delicious!

    • foodgardenkitchen Says:

      We’ve really only had success with cauliflower the past two years, and especially this year (we’ve been trying for 5 or 6 years – I don’t give up easily 🙂 ). The way the caterpillars hatch and get to the Spring plantings, coupled with the squishing of said caterpillars makes the leaves unusable (unless you’re desperate to eat) but I’ve used Fall-planted brassica leaves in similar ways (although the “He” of “Us” was less than thrilled…).

  2. kitsapfg Says:

    Everything looks really good. You are already transitioning the spring crops out and rotating in the mid to late summer varieties. I am still at the place where the spring crops are producing and the summer crops are growing along side of them but are a ways away yet from producing. Lots of good eating in your harvest basket this week. Have you considered doing some quick hand pollination of the squash with a soft makeup brush? I do that all the time as our cooler climate can make the pollinators go quiet just when you need them the most.

    • foodgardenkitchen Says:

      I probably am going to end up having to hand pollinate. When I went out this evening, one of the yellow squash I thought had been pollinated had started to rot. It’s just one more thing I have to do in morning while trying to get out the door though…

  3. Mike R Says:

    Diverse harvest and nice cauliflower. Like you I’ve had recent success with cauliflower but early on they just did not do well for me. I have no clue what I’m doing different. Maybe it’s a bit of luck and better timing.

  4. Norma Chang Says:

    Beautiful harvest, such a lovely variety. I gave up growing cauliflower use to do well but recently no head.

  5. Jenny Says:

    everything looks fantastic, but that cauliflower just calling to be picked

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