30 June Weekly Update

One day harvest

One day harvest

Another day

Another day

Basil and oregano

Basil and oregano

Bucket of Little Finger Carrots

Bucket of Little Finger Carrots

Celery & dill

Celery & dill

Haricot Verts

Haricot Verts

Another Day II

Another Day II

This year's Garlic harvest cured and trimmed

This year’s Garlic harvest cured and trimmed

Yes we have Squash

Yes we have Squash

And Yet Another Day

And Yet Another Day

This week’s pickings were:  celery (twice), dill for refrigerator pickles (also twice), cucumbers and summer squash galore (including the first zucchini), 2 types of green beans, tomatillos, beet greens (the beets never sized up but we’ll run the greens through the juicer), the first small jalapeno pepper, a few test carrots early in the week and then all of the Little Finger carrots on Sunday morning, and basil and oregano to use fresh in a pasta sauce Sunday evening (which is also using one of the last pints of tomato sauce we still have from last year).

The test carrots were smaller than they should be so I’ll let one box of them grow a bit longer but I went ahead and pulled all of the Little Finger variety on Sunday morning because the field peas growing in the same box are getting to the size that they’ll soon be encroaching on the carrot space.  This is one of the perils of doing a close succession planting – things may not be quite ready when you need the box and it can be a quandary deciding what to do.  In this case, we have many useable carrots so we’re pretty happy with the harvest.  Most of the carrots will be pressure canned sometime this week.

We currently have 5 quarts of refrigerator pickles going in the ‘fridge.  And we’re pressure canning much of the summer squash and most of the haricot verts on Sunday afternoon.  This time we’ll do the squash plain to add to vegetable soups later in the year rather than making them into pickles.  We’re also planning on making salsa verde soon with the tomatillos which are accumulating into a respectable useable amount in the refrigerator.  We might have time one evening after work this week to cook up a batch.

Early in the week we sprayed copper fungicide on the tomatoes & apple trees again.  On Sunday morning we went ahead and sprayed the tomatoes with a calcium-magnesium spray.  We’ll do it again in a couple of weeks to hopefully preempt any blossom end rot problems on the fruit.  The garlic was dried and cured (it normally takes about 2 weeks) when we checked them on Sunday morning so we went ahead and trimmed them.  A handful of the larger bulbs were saved out for fresh use over the next few months and we’ll mince the remaining bulbs sometime in the next week and freeze them in some olive oil to use as needed over the next year.

Japanese beetles are back.  We spread Milky Spore three times last year and once this year with two more applications coming later in the year.  We hope this natural cure greatly reduces the number of Japanese beetles in the future!

We were going to dig the rest of the potatoes over the weekend but it’s rained a lot daily for the past three days so the soil is too wet.  Hopefully we’ll be able to dig them over the July 4th holiday weekend.  We also pulled up the three remaining cauliflower plants on Saturday.  They weren’t showing strong signs of forming heads and I’ve gotten tired of checking them for caterpillars and squishing any I find so into the compost pile they went.

Lastly, we pulled up the remaining onions, worked and fertilized a couple of the boxes that had held the onions, and seeded lima beans (aka butter beans) in the two boxes.  One box was seeded with Henderson Bush limas (the type we usually grow) and the second box was seeded mostly with “Fordhook No. 242” variety.  We’re trying a second variety this season to see if there’s much difference between the two.  I say “mostly seeded” with this new variety because the seed pack didn’t have enough seeds to do an entire box (surprising!) so part of one row is the Henderson bush variety.

Watermelons in former Cauliflower box

Watermelons in former Cauliflower box – they were transplanted into the box about 3 weeks ago and now have room to spread out with the removal of the non-producing cauliflower plants

And yes, we're not done with Harvests!  One more

And yes, we’re not done with Harvests! One more

Melons go Wild

Melons go Wild

Huge Summer Squash Plants

Huge Summer Squash Plants

Green paste tomatoes

Green paste tomatoes

Former Carrot space withfield peas on trellis

Former carrot space with field peas on trellis

Butternete Squash - Hope its pollinated

Butternut Squash – Hope its pollinated!

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15 Responses to “30 June Weekly Update”

  1. Jenny Says:

    WOW! That’s a whole lot of squash and carrots! Very nice green beans and cucumbers too.

  2. Patsy Says:

    That is a gorgeous harvest you have there!

  3. kitsapfg Says:

    Your garden is just so productive. Amazing! I love the last pic of the little butternut. I think the squash patch is one of the most interesting garden crops to watch develop. They are 1) visible right from the start 2) grow so fast you can literally see them get bigger before your eyes and 3) the fruits are satisfyingly large and attractive.

    • foodgardenkitchen Says:

      Time will tell if we’re able to successfully grow winter squash this year. In past years, we’ve had problems with fruit rotting on the vine or disengaging from the vine before they were ripe.

      I over-planted this year so if we manage to be successful with all the plants this year, we’ll be in some serious quantity of squash come Fall…

  4. The Sage Butterfly Says:

    My squash is just now fruiting, so it is nice to see yours at that stage. I don’t have as many squash bugs this year because I have been diligently picking them off. Happy harvest!

  5. Barbie Says:

    Yes, we have squash? LOL It looks like you’ll be saying the same about the melons! It looks like you are feeding your plants…people! *snicker*

    • foodgardenkitchen Says:

      I hope we get some melons this year! It’s been two, maybe three, years since we’ve successfully grown more than one melon. Last year, the critters got to our melons before we did – we’ll be taking more precautions this year 🙂

  6. akannie Says:

    Beautiful–I’m jealous. We’re playing Russian Roulette with the weather this year. Gardens in so late, we are just now seeing green bean babies, and this time last year, I was canning already!

  7. Nicole Says:

    Some very cool cucumbers-would love to have those in various salads. You have a lot of harvesting going on, now!

  8. Mike R Says:

    Good luck with the milky spore treatment. Japanese beetles can be a terrible pest. I think the seed companies recoup the cost of new varieties by putting just a few seeds in the packet. But many of them really are better than the old varieties.

  9. Budding and Blooming Says:

    Wow… look at all that squash! Looks like you are having an awesome harvest this year. Enjoy and good luck with the Japanese beetles. I do the tedious approach of plunking individual beetles in soapy water, but I think they multiply faster than I can kill them!

  10. Kentucky Fried Garden Says:

    So much squash and cucumbers, amazing! And the carrots are just adorable.

  11. Bee Girl (AKA Melissa) Says:

    Holy cow! That’s a lot of squash and cukes!!! Amazing! We just have starts and a few flowers at this point! In awe…that is all 😉

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