Falling into Autumn

Wow, how time flies! It’s already been 2 months since our last blog post. Double WOW for the tomato year we’ve had this year. Amazingly, many of the tomato plants planted way back in April are still producing, although looking pretty ragged. This will likely be their last week as it’s forecast to frost next weekend (a bit later than average for us). We have so much canned and frozen tomato sauce that we may not need to grow sauce tomatoes next year!

Plenty of Tomatoes

Plenty of Tomatoes

Last of the Tomatoes

Getting to be the Last of the Tomatoes

It’s been a great season in the garden (except for melons which eluded us this year). We’ve gotten so many winter squash of various sorts this year that we’re probably going to give some away. There are just far too many for us to consume. We decided to try roasting the seeds of the ones we’ve used and loved the result so much that we’ve roasted seeds three times this season. Just separate as much pulp from the seeds as reasonably possible; rinse and pat dry; toss with oil of your choice, salt, and paprika (we love the paprika addition); and roast in a single layer at 300-325 degrees for about 20 minutes (stirring at 10 minutes in). They made a great crunchy snack! We stored them in the ‘fridge.

Roasted Winter Squash Seeds

Roasted Winter Squash Seeds

Winter Squash

Winter Squash

Yes More

Yes More

You didn't think we were done did you?

You didn’t think we were done did you?

It’s been a very productive season in the garden, even though time constraints left us tending to the garden only two or three times a week this year. We got plenty of figs (unexpected because last winter was really harsh and parts of both trees were damaged), carrots, butter beans, field peas, haricots verts and other green beans, beets, cucumbers, sweet and hot peppers, okra, herbs of various sorts, eggplant, shelling beans, and a smattering of raspberries and blackberries (which never make it inside to be photographed as she eats them as she picks them).

Harvest

Harvest

Harvests like squash

Harvests like squash

See the squash?

See the squash?

Summer Harvest Day

Summer Harvest Day

Carrots

Carrots

Canned Carrots

Canned Carrots

Canned Pickled Taqueria Carrots

Canned Pickled Taqueria Carrots

Field Peas & Butter Beans

Field Peas & Butter Beans

Flagrano Shelling Beans

Flagrano Shelling Beans drying

Butter Beans

Butter Beans – Lots of Shelling Happened!

Field Peas

Blanched Field Peas & a Couple of Radishes

The fall “crops” – cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, Chinese kale, mustard, and lacinato kale – are all doing really well. The broccoli and cauliflower haven’t produced anything yet but the plants are the best looking ones of these types we’ve ever grown. We attribute it partially to our willingness to try hybrids (as opposed to heirlooms) this year. Lately we’ve been harvesting radishes and arugula for salads. We’ve had to purchase lettuce this season because our lettuce crop didn’t do well with the neglect and didn’t make it. C’est la vie…

Parsley

Parsley container

Kale

Kale patch

Cauliflower & Broccoli

Cauliflower & Broccoli box

Cabbages & Chinese Kale

Cabbages & Chinese Kale

It's the Great Cabbage, Charlie Brown!

It’s the Great Cabbage, Charlie Brown!

Autumn Garden

Autumn Garden

Autumn Garden 2

Another View of the Autumn Garden

Unfortunately, when we went out to the garden this weekend, two of the apple trees we planted last fall were broken about two feet above the ground. It was very disheartening. We suspect deer. We cut the trees at the break and hope they will come back next year. At least 3 feet of growth was lost from each tree.

Broken and Sad Apple Tree

Broken and Sad Apple Tree

Shattered Dreams Apple Tree

Shattered Dreams Apple Tree

Hopefully it won’t be two more months until our next blog post, but you never know. There’s just so much time in the day and choices about priorities have to be made. Thanks for reading!

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8 Responses to “Falling into Autumn”

  1. Keisha Walker Says:

    The cabbage is gorgeous! All of your harvest is abundant and beautiful. Happy Eating….

  2. Dave @ OurHappyAcres Says:

    Lovely winter squash! I do see lots of similarities between the varieties. I miss growing field peas, but there’s only so much room in the garden. Good to see you post again!

  3. dvelten Says:

    Nice to see your harvest photos again. You had quite a good year. I’m enjoying the mild fall because we’re supposed to have another nasty winter.

  4. Jenny Says:

    It’s so sad that apple tree got damaged and hope it will come back and grow well next spring. We keep our netted so the deer don’t eat them. And you can keep winter squash for several month in a dark cool dry area without spoiling and use it as needed for meals.

  5. Rachel at Grow a Good Life Says:

    I enjoyed the update and seeing all that your garden produced over the past few months. Your fall crops look really good too especially the cabbage. Wow!

  6. newbiegardengirl Says:

    Your broccoli & cabbage box looks great! How do you combat the cabbage worms?

  7. Margaret Says:

    Those are lovely harvests you have had. Love the round, flattish winter squash! And it looks like you will have a bumper fall crop as well. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that your apple trees recover.

  8. daphnegould Says:

    Lovely harvests. I love all that squash.

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