Archive for the ‘potato’ Category

Weekly Garden Update: July 31st

August 1, 2010

July 31, Weekly Garden Update:

My son in a Tree when he was Younger

To start with, I want to express my extreme pleasure that my son just matriculated from high school a year early!  I’m so very proud of him.  He got his test scores back yesterday and consistently scored in the top 1-3% in the nation for high school students.  When he was 16 I thought we might have to kill him to get any peace, but a year and a half later he has finalized this period of his life by reverting to form, which is that of an extremely bright and thoughtful individual.

*                                                               *                                                             *

Apple in the Tree

We have blueberries, but the two blueberry pictures I took didn’t come out.  But look, here is an apple!  No figs this year, but the fig trees are growing on schedule, and are six feet tall.  In two years we should have 12’ fig trees and figs galore.

Black Jack Fig Tree

Our Yukon gold potatoes appear to be happy, and the russets are really springing up now.  This is our second succession of potatoes this year.

Russetts

Yukons

The Harvest has been good this week.  We have harvested cucumbers, Haricot Verts, Blue Lake green beans, Dutch-Half runner green beans, oodles of Tomatoes, Italian Sweet Relleno peppers, Ancho peppers, Anaheim peppers, Green bell peppers, Jalapenos, and Cayennes.  In addition, I dried an entire crop of basil, which doesn’t seem to have dented the production of same.  We got a lovely eggplant, which we’ll be eating this week.

Harvest 1

More harvest, different day

The whole garden is looking lush this week.  The melons and butternut squash are breaking free of their boxes and trellises and running wild.

Squash gone Wild!

Melons

The field peas are blooming, and the butter beans are too.

Field Peas

Butter Beans

Dutch Half-runners

Image if these dutch half-runners were full on pole beans…they’re already more than 8-9 feet long in places.

Fresh ground Cayenne Powder

I took all those cayenne peppers that you’ve been seeing pictures of and dried them for about 16 hours in a 170 degree oven.  Then this morning I put them all in my spice grinder and made some lovely cayenne powder that smells sweet like honeysuckle and then bites like moonshine.

An Eggplant in the Garden

We’ve been eating on the hot pepper jelly I made last week, and it seems to have addictive qualities.

A local biodynamic farmer is gonna give us some kaolin clay powder to spray on our plants and try out.  I’ll be going up to his farm this week to pick it up and deliver him a jar of the watermelon rind pickle from the watermelon he sold us.

Reach for the Sky!

Haricot Verts

Mycorrhizal Fungi - visible evidence

Flowers in the Apple Orchard

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Weekly Garden Update: July 25!

July 25, 2010

Weekly Garden Update, July 25:

Eggplant

Wow, we’re having some record heat around here these days!  Yesterday we got up and were outside at 6:30 am harvesting the box of Kennebec potatoes, and doing weekly maintenance in the garden because it was only 77 degrees then.  Later it got up to 100 degrees, but we were comfortably ensconced inside by then.

Harvest

We pulled up the last of our yellow squash yesterday, the squash vine-borers got them.  We have enough yellow squash to eat this week, but as of August we’ll be out of them.  Strangely we have 2 volunteer squash of unknown variety coming up, so we’ll see if they live long enough.  And the cucumber plants we planted in June may do something as well.  Several older cucumber plants were removed yesterday as well, and we got the last of those cucumbers as well.

Harvest2

The Kennebecs produced the best of all our potatoes this year.  We got as much out of this one box as we did the other 1.75 boxes of potatoes we harvested.  And they were the largest as well.  Last night we boiled some of the smaller ones, and served them with parsley and butter at dinner, and they were delicious.

Some Kennebecs

Kennebecs

Our first butter bean pods are setting up!  Blue Lake green beans seem to be waiting for something, but the Dutch Half-runner green beans are trying to catch up with the Haricot Verts.

Butterbeans

This brings me to the 3.5 lbs of Haricot Verts I harvested on Thursday.  There were so many I just had to weigh them.  We strung them, and then I canned 5 pints of green beans and 2 pints of Dilly Beans.  There were beans left over, but not a lot.  Then we picked another double handful yesterday.

Peppers

Cayennes

Along with the haricot verts, we picked about 40 tomatoes this week, several dozen jalapenos, cayenne, Anaheim, and sweet Italian relleno peppers.  We’re even starting to get some small bell peppers, and harvested one of them.

Haricot Verts

Either today or tomorrow I’ll be making Hot Pepper Jelly out of the jalapenos, sweet Italians, and 18 Habaneros we bought.  Next year I’m gonna be growing either Habaneros or Scotch Bonnets – I just can’t see buying them in the future.

Garden 1

Garden 2

Garden 3

Melons

Tomatoes

tomatoes

Cayenne Peppers

July 18 Weekly Garden Update:

July 18, 2010

Inspired by the excellent post on composting 101 by Engineered Garden, I decided to include a blurb on our own composting set up.

I’m going to try not to repeat anything he said.  There are a variety of compost piles you can make, and not all of them need to be “efficient”, if you don’t need them to be.   I’ll even go so far as to say that when it comes to composting we are downright lazy.

Hardwire cloth compost

First I cut a length of 4’ hardware cloth fencing, and wired it into a circle.  Put that on the ground at the edge of the woods.  We fill this with grass cuttings, leaves, leafy branches, dead lawn and forest stuff, and rip-outs of pea vines, etc.  We never turn it, but it still cuts its own volume in half every 3rd of a year or so and I just keep packing stuff on top.

Earth Machina

We got an “earth machine” plastic composter from our county services cheap.  The thing itself was made of recycled this and that.  It has a little door at the bottom and a twist off lid on the top.  Dump kitchen compost garbage, and/or other dead or dying things whenever you please.  Shovel compost out of the bottom door.   We mostly use this as overflow for the worm farm now.

Early Picture of the Wormfarm

I built us a worm farm out of concrete blocks and a plywood sheet.   We are on very hard clay here in the piedmont of North Carolina, so I just dug a wee bit down to level the site and then I placed the concrete blocks in a rectangle the size I wanted it.  Our friendly county worm-farmer has something like this about 100’ long – we decided we’d start smaller (laughs).  You can feed the worms all the kitchen compostable stuff, wet newspaper, cardboard, leaf and grass cuttings – whatever you have.  They don’t like too much citrus, but they love your coffee grounds.  You never have to worry about ratios, they do all the work, and you don’t need one of those multi-level fruit-fly generators in your kitchen either.  I hinged the plywood lid in the middle so that I can open either half, and when one half gets full we dump stuff in the other half for a few months.  About once a quarter she harvests parts of it that are ready, checks on the worms, and that’s it.  If you want more volume of compost you can put in more worms, make it deeper or cover more area.  There is no mortar and the blocks are loosely jointed – it has plenty of ventilation and drainage.  The only thing I’d like to do at this point is paint the cover so it looks nice and lasts longer.  We get enough compost at this point to feed  our boxes, and that’s all we really need.

HARVEST update –

Haricot Verts

This week we were engulfed by haricot verts, and I canned 5 pints of same while we ate others.  I canned 6 pints of tomato sauce and we are eating tomatoes daily.  We got more cucumbers, in fact I’m in the process of canning 4 more pints of pickles at this moment.  Yellow squash, anaheims, Italian sweet rellenos, cayennes, jalapenos are plentiful.

More harvest

We have pimentos, bell peppers, and several others making rapidly now.  And we have an actual purple eggplant – something that evaded us last year.

Cayennes

Pimento

Bell

There is a charentais melon growing along with our moon and starts watermelons.

Melons

Melons

The kennebecs are definitely ready to harvest now, and the new Yukon golds and russests are springing up nicely.

Yukons

New russets

Our seedlings in the basement germinated this week and are happy under their lights – fall broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts.

We sprayed fish emulsion this morning.

Blue Lakes

The blue lakes and the dutch half-runner beans are making — we should be harvesting both this week.

This week we lost our 2 zucchini plants and the rest of our acorn squash plants.  One of our farmer friends told us that he starts his squash early inside, then sets them out by April 20th in order to get production before the plants are gone, so we will try this next year.  And we’ll be picking up that kaolin clay this next week and will report on results when we have them.

Eggplant!

As I write this it is 94 degrees and 98% humidity outside.  We’ve gotten enough thunder storms in the past couple of weeks to keep us from having to irrigate from the well, which is very nice.

Field Peas

Weekly Garden Update — Independence Day!

July 4, 2010

Tomatillos

Tomatillos Hang / Glowing Paper Lanterns Grow / Shine Your Light on Me

It’s July and we’re having record lows.  It got down to 56 degrees this week one morning and didn’t get above 75 that day.  Today it is back up to a more normal 84 degrees.  Lack of rain required that we water the garden early yesterday morning.

In the Jar

We’re already having a lot of fun with the pressure canner.  Last weekend we did the 3 pints of haricot vert.  On Friday I did 4 pints of salsa (see link for Preserved Salsa in the recipe column on the main page).  The fun thing about the salsa was that we got to use tomatoes, onions, garlic, tomatillos, jalapenos, Anaheim, Serrano, and el Chaco peppers from the garden, along with our own basil and oregano.  The fresh stuff tasted great, and we’ve already opened a sealed jar to nibble on.  It tastes great, and has a lot of depth and complex flavor.

Making Salsa

Yesterday we made dill pickles out of some of our cucumbers, plus one of her workmates at work gave her 3 cucumbers we threw in as well (whee)!  We used the recipe from the Ball Blue Canning Book for “Dill Pickles” and followed the instructions for making them “kosher style” in 4 of the jars.  We got 6 pints of pickles from this, and they are sitting on a countertop now all sealed and happy.  While they were cooling I went to go look at them and one went “plink” right in front of me, making me jump.  They look great from the outside, but we’re supposed to wait!?! 6-8 weeks for them to season, oh sigh.

Kennebec Box

We had a potato harvest this week.  We harvested all the Yukon gold, caribe, carola, red Pontiac, and the single Nikola potatoes we planted.  The nikola plant had excellent production.  It was a freebie that the potato company threw in.  The caribe, not so much.  But the Pontiacs, Yukons, and Carolas did fine.  I’m mad just thinking about how many Yukon Golds we would have gotten had the voles not eaten 75% of that box.  We have one full box of Kennebecs left to harvest.  The new box of Yukon golds is looking great, and we’re putting in a box of organic russets this week.

Potatoes

More Potatoes

Nikola Potato

We also harvested all the onions this week, some of which are curing in the basement.

Onions

Speaking of voles, we had a single vole hole and a single celery plant get attacked.  We laid down claymores on the perimeter (mouse traps) and napalmed the tunnels (Kaput) and no sign since.

Box 1

Haricot Vert

Tomatoes, haricot vert, and yellow squash keep rolling in.

Butternut Squash

We lost one acorn squash to unknown causes, possibly from heat wilt during more than a week of 95+ degree temperatures.  The same period saw the mesclun mix on the side porch die as well.  I harvested herbs again this week, and dried most of them.

Stored Garlic

The garlic is all cured, sorted, bagged, labeled, and stored in the dark cool of the basement.

Italian Rellenos

This morning we added compost to 4 boxes and reworked the boxes.  We turned the compost and opened up the right hand section of the worm farm to adding fresh compost.

Celery

And we are harvesting celery.  Some of them are showing signs of giving in to heat, and we have decided to harvest that part that we want to blanch and freeze.  90% of our celery consumption is in soups, roasted meat dishes, crock pot dishes, casseroles, pasta dishes, and other dishes that are cooked.  We really only eat raw celery in the chicken, tuna, or ham salad repertoire.

Eggplants

We are putting up tomato sauce as I write this, and harvested another 5 or so pounds of tomatoes that will go into more sauce later this week.  We reset some trellises.  All boxes of tomatoes, tomatillos, squash, and melons got trained.

San Marzanos

A duck is brining in the refrigerator, and later we’ll be boiling it and then roasting it for dinner.  And to think yesterday I told my father “We aren’t doing much for the 4th…”

Wheee!  Happy July 4th!

Butter Beans

Crowder Peas

Melons

Overlooking

Little House on the Piedmont

June 27, 2010

On the vine

We’re feeling like we live in Little House on the Prairie this week, as we bought canning supplies, wide-mouth canning jars, and a small (16-qt) Presto Pressure Canner.

New Canner

Canned Green Beans!

Our first experiment today was 3 pints of haricot vert, and we’re surprisingly excited.  We are already developing a list of things to can, and gathering treasured recipes (like Peach Pickles!) from family.  Watermelon rind pickles, cucumber pickles, radish pickles, HOT pepper jelly, etc.  Next thing you know I’m going to seriously need a pickling crock and grape leaves.

The voles have been absent – no losses on our part, no vole sign or dead voles in traps.  Is this just a cease-fire, or have we won ….until next time?

Tomatoes 1

Tomatoes 3

Tomatoes 6

We are harvesting tomatoes and cucumbers and haricot vert and yellow summer squash daily.  I just haven’t been able to get myself worked up about weighing any of it so far, though I think about it sometimes.  There are really only two of us, and we measure our success more by what we end up buying (or the lack of) than what we are producing, since she keeps excellent records on what we buy as part of the budget process.

Ready to Eat

Little onions

Squash

New Potatoes

From now on we can harvest celery whenever we please, until we run out or the frost comes.

Celery box

Eggplants are blossoming, as are the Blue Lake green beans.  Dutch half-runners and butter beans are putting out tendrils.

Eggplant blossom

Blue Lakes

The sage, tarragon, and rosemary have completely restored themselves since the last harvesting, and the dill is out-growing my efforts to use it.  Basil is setting up nicely, and we have 2 different mints that I just mow back whenever we have to mow.

Sage

Basil

Potatoes, tomatoes, and peppers are still growing.  I am topping and suckering each tomato plant as it reaches 8’.  We got some new potatoes this week, and plan to harvest the rest of the box most affected by the voles, then replant organic russets, like we already replanted the organic Yukon golds, which are growing nicely.

Potatoes

Potatoes

Recent Yukon Golds

We have some really large cayenne peppers growing, as well as pimento, Serrano, anaheims (harvested 2 more this week), anchos, jalapenos (harvested 3 for another round of the muffins)…well we have a lot of peppers.

Peppers

The Japanese beetle season is here, and it is open season on them.  We have beetle bag traps up, and they’re filling nicely.  No significant damage from them yet except for a few apple trees leaves, so far.

Happy Cucumber

We had to pull up a box of cucumbers and zucchini, which is always frustrating and disappointing.  We replanted in another open box, and the plants are already leaping up.  We’re not sure, but we *think* they were hit hard by an unidentified (so far) brown bug that were all over them.  We squished them, and have been squishing any signs of them, and no replication of the problem yet.  If anyone had a clue about this vague problem, we’d be pleased to consider any theories.

Flower

Weekly Garden Update: Summer Solstice 2010

June 20, 2010

8' Tomato

Tomatoes have once again outgrown our 8’ trellis.  Last year they grew up and then started back down, with the longest one having a total length of approximately 14 feet.  This year I’m topping them as they hit the 8’ mark, and plan to sucker more of them as well.

Tomatoes

San Marzanos

The war of attrition against the vole menace seems to be tilting our way.  In the last 2 weeks we’ve only lost 1 celery plant and 1 eggplant, and we have racked up 2 voles in traps, and a total lack of new vole hole activity.  (I started humming the Ballad of Roger Young while I wrote this (chuckle)).

We took another step this week away from the mainstream:  we bought canning supply implements and wide-mouth pint Mason jars.  With our large metal pots, this will allow us to do water-bath canning.  We’re seriously considering splurging on a pressure canner at some point as well.

Haricot Verts

We harvested haricot vert at least 4 days out of the past 6!  Oh, snap beans galore to be steamed and gobbled.  We’ve been harvesting a few yellow squash which were promptly sautéed in butter and devoured.  We got our first Anaheim pepper off the vine, and we have jalapenos, cayenne, and Italian Rellenos growing.  At least one tomato is coming off the vines daily.

Squash!

Harvest

Today we harvested our first cucumber, and more celery.  More cucumbers will be harvestable tomorrow or the next day.

Cucumber

Celery

It has been 15 days since we racked the garlic, and this morning I cleaned and polished the bulbs after trimming down the stems and the roots.  I separated damaged bulbs or bulbs with little or no paper covering to be eaten sooner.  I smell like garlic.

We pulled up all the snow peas this morning, and reworked the bed.  And we weeded and tidied up and picked squash bugs, etc.

Field Peas (Cow Peas)

Butter Beans

Dutch Half-Runners

The butter beans, field peas, and Dutch half-runners are growing nicely, as you can see here.

Here is our butternut squash growing up the trellis, and in the background are the tomatillos.

Butternut Squash

Last but not least, this is a color of day lily of which I am particularly fond, and a couple of extra photos from the garden.

Day Lily

Melons

Yukon Gold Potatoes - Planted recently

Haricot Vert

May 23 Garden Update

May 23, 2010

The Vole War continues, and we seem to be winning a few rounds.  We’ve found 3 dead voles in traps and 1 just lying on the ground.  We haven’t lost any celery plants in over a week, and most of the rest of the predation seems to have slowed down since Thursday.

Cucumbers

However before this we lost 6 of 8 eggplants, 5 pepper plants, and one of our potato boxes has had about 75% of its stalks wiped out.  I put down Warfarin again today in those three boxes, hoping that the cessation of activity since Thursday is a result of many dead little furry bodies somewhere.

Zucchini

We harvested the rest of our spring kale this week, along with more carrots and 4 separate harvests of snow peas.

Carrots & Snowpeas

The watermelon radishes were not making in accordance with her expectations (none to date) and she pulled them up as an example to any other non-performing plants.

Yellow squash

We planted a box of blue lake green beans where the kale was, along with replanting of eggplant and pepper seedlings we got from a local gardening center.  We’re seriously considering if we can reseed some potatoes.

Celery

The tomatoes are couldn’t be happier, and are flowering like crazy.

Tomatoes

Peppers

Winter Squash

More tomatoes

Haricot Verts

Even more Tomatoes

RAIN.

May 19, 2010

We have almost 4 inches of rain in the big gauge from the past 72 hours.  Over 3 inches of it on Monday, enough to put a gully through the mulch at one place, and another gully down the driveway.

After only having 0.75 inches in the previous 45 days, we certainly needed rain.  It came down in sheets, thick enough to obscure the green forest around us in a blur, drumming on the roof in that thick quiet hum, like standing in the middle of a power station, feeling the electricity thrum through you.

The garden loved it.

A couple of weeks ago, right after we put the peppers in, it got down to the upper 30s at night two nights in a row.  It seems to have halted the peppers’ growth a bit, hopefully they will pick up again now.

Snow Peas

We direct seeded Greek and Genovese basil this past week to augment the container plantings, as we harvested some lettuce plants (enough for 2 weeks of eating).  There is still at least a month’s worth of lettuce out there.  We harvested all the spinach we had left, as it was starting to bolt.

Lettuces

The haricot verts are growing well, as are the cucumbers.  We filled in a few gaps where some seeds didn’t germinate with new seed.

Lettuces

Spinach

This is our first really successful planting of snow peas.  We have tried them 3 times before, and were about to give up on them in this environment.  Lo and behold, they are growing up to 6 feet high, and we’ve now harvested 2 meals from them, with a lot more coming.  The blossoms are lovely on them.

Snow Peas

Taters

Some of the potatoes are blooming.  Apparently voles ate 8 of the stalks coming up, ruining at least 4 hills of our potatoes in the lowest box and 2 hills in another box.

Our onions are doing waaaay better than last year.  The sets are still much farther ahead than the seeded ones, but one of the varieties of the seeded ones are far ahead of the rest.  Hopefully they will make this year.  At this time last year we already knew the onion crop was a failure.

Carrots

Celery

Carrots are happy in several box locations.  The rabbit has not been caught again leaping over the 2 foot high fencing.

We started 9 each of the watermelon and charentais melons 3 weeks ago.  Only 4 charentais and 3 watermelons germinated.  We will direct seed once we put them out in place of where the sugar snap peas are now.

Tarragon

There is apparent deer nibbling on some of the potatoes in the box at the edge of the woods, but they must not have been a meal of preference because it has been relatively minor overall.

Two of the 8 eggplants have been lost to voles, as have a few more celeries and 2 ancho peppers.  I’m stunned that they’re attacking eggplants and peppers, and it brings out the Marvin the Martian in me (“I hope you realize that this means war”).

Traps have gotten 2 of the little you-know-whats so far.  We’ve disseminated mothballs in the mulch and down some of their holes and placed mouse traps out for them.  In addition, we gave up and bought some warfarin.  Warfarin has the least risk and rate of secondary poisoning (things that eat things killed by it).  I am limiting it down their holes in boxes with fences and covering netting.  We don’t want to be killing hawks, and I don’t want the dog, or even the rabbits and squirrels to get at it.  On the other hand, we really need to get the voles, or they are going to destroy the garden.  We’ve never cared if  voles or moles or anything dug in the yard, but the count is up to over 10 celery plants, 6-8 potatoes, peppers, eggplants, and sugar snap peas.  We don’t have the space, the inclination, or the resources to afford to house a vole colony, though we don’t like putting down even controlled bait stations.  When even the resident rabid animal welfarist says “kill them”, I know it is time.

Garlic is looking like it should.  We plan on grabbing a garlic every week and eating it, not only to enjoy the fresh green garlic, but to monitor the grow of the bulbs.   Summer and winter squash seedlings are spreading their big leaves, already you can see the variegations in the leaves from the house.  The tomatoes are growing like there is no tomorrow.

We have achieved broccoli!  We have 4 heads of broccoli making.  This is the first broccoli we’ve started ourselves and we’re very excited.  The cauliflower is looking indecisive.  The (mostly) early heat this year may inhibit this spring’s crop; several of the farmers I’ve talked to have indicated that all the field broccoli looks fairly stunted in this county.

Broccoli

We’re trying to figure out why stuff we’re growing in containers inside and on the porch don’t do as well as things we put in the boxes.  It’s the same dirt, and we try to treat them the same.  The only thing we can figure is that maybe the containers dry out faster than we think.  They all look a bit leggy compared to the same stuff in boxes.  I’m going to seed some more mycorrhizal fungi into them; maybe that will help.

This update is late because of the weekend goings on, see the previous post.

April Garden Update

April 27, 2010

Lettuce!

More Lettuce!

Spinach & Lettuce

We have harvestable baby spinach, along with the ubercrop of lettuce and radishes.  The potatoes have been mounded yet again, the boxes are all full (we started with a 4” deep soil base, and have been adding to them since).

Bed o' Taters

Celery

Our broccoli and cauliflower are doing much better than the ones we did last year.  The seed onions needed thinning, and the set onions are way ahead of them in size.  All the garlic now has 5-7 leaves, a few of the stalks are nearly 4’ high.

We planted 30 tomato plants this past weekend, including green zebra, bloody butcher, brandywine, beefsteak, early girl, better boy, and san marzanos.  We also planted 2 tomatillos, 1 box of haricot vert (2 rows each 12’), and 6 summer squash:  yellow and zucchini.  We planted 3 varieties of cucumbers.  Winter squash seeds were set to germinate inside, both acorn and butternut.

Peppers

Peas

The pepper seedlings are in their final stages of hardening off, and we hope to plant them either this coming weekend or the next at the latest.

In the flower parts of the lot, we have azaleas and irises in bloom now, the daffodils and the tulips have faded away for the spring.  We have dahlia, oriental lily, day lily, and calla lily bulbs that will be coming along.  The moonflower vine almost looks like it is biding its time, though its growth is thick near the ground.

Irises

Azaleas

The apple trees have what look to be tiny apple pods on them.  Given their young age, we are most pleased!  The figs and the blueberries are puttering right along, doing nicely.  My lime mint hasn’t come back up so far this year, not sure why.  If it doesn’t, I’ll try to plant it again in a different location.

We gave away celery and tomato seedlings that had prospered, but that we had no room for, we hope that they will do well in their new homes.

After we planted everything last weekend, we went back in and put up the trellising for the year.

Black Jack Fig

Boxes

Boxes View

New boxes

Po-tay-toes

Grow, my pretties, Grow!

April 17, 2010

We saw our first hummingbird of the year in the garden yesterday!  Last year we had one feeder up, and one hummingbird was a bit of a bully, trying to guard it as much as possible.  She received a Christmas present of another one this year.  We put up both earlier this week, and have been rewarded with their presence already.

Mounded potatoes

Mounded Potatoes

Celery Seedlings

We mounded the potatoes twice this week, that’s just how fast they are growing.  We transplanted 45 of our celery seedlings to the garden.  All the other seedlings we have needed to be repotted *again*, so we’ve been doing that.  We found a lot of seedling pots at the local recycling center, because we’d run out.

We’re busy researching how to cure garlic, including asking local farmers for tips.  And we’re researching how to keep our garlic the longest, because frankly it looks like our harvest is going to be more than we could eat in a year, which would be exciting.

Lettuces

Radish

Broccoli raab

We continue to harvest record quantities of lettuce with even more coming along, and also this week harvested radishes and broccoli raab, as well as some pea shoots.

Radishes

Radishes

In two weeks, we’ll be putting our tomato plants out, along with all our pepper plants.

Since we put out the castor oil granules, I haven’t seen any new vole digging in the boxes.  We’re crossing our fingers.  I gave some of my moonflower seeds to a couple we’re friends with, they had moved this winter and are restarting their farm all from scratch, and didn’t have a moonflower plant in the new location.

Cauliflower

Harvest

One of our cauliflowers is heading up!  Now it is a race for how big can it grow before we can’t stand it anymore and just take it to be eaten.  I’m favoring just simply steaming it, served with a bit of butter and some pepper.